Point Park Students Aim to Unite Music Cultures Across the Globe

Published On September 1, 2015 | By Mackenzie Sugrue | Music
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Photos provided by artists.

Growing up in Brazil, Point Park University student Gabriel Colombo was constantly surrounded by music. His family and friends all shared a common love for music, and his passion for it now is a defining characteristic in the young director. Assisting his Uncle with video filming and watching his actress mother perform sparked a fire in Colombo, and now, he’s bringing his passions to light with a self-made documentary. Titled “Our Rhythm,” the project is set to begin filming this fall.

Beatboxer

Shodekeh

Colombo got his plan in motion by assembling a crew – comprised of both current and former Point Park University students – and they’re setting out to change the world through music. In the film, Colombo and his fellow crew members will be spending one week with musicians from seven separate countries that differ in social classes, economy, religion, and culture, including: Mozambique, Turkey, Russia, Vietnam, Cuba, Brazil, and the United States. They will focus on concerts, rehearsals, and private performances from various artists, such as Shodekeh, a beat-boxer from Maryland; Likute, a traditional 3-piece, all-female outlet from Mozambique, and Ceren Gündoğdu, a female Turkish singer.

Ceren Gundogdu

Ceren Gündoğdu

The hope is that the film will give people a new perspective on how music affects and creates culture, and vice versa. The goal is to open people’s minds to other cultures and ways of life through music.

“Instead of introducing people to the culture(s), we’re introducing them to the music first,” Columbo explains, “Through their music, you’ll see who they are [as a culture].”

Likute

Likute

The group created a Kickstarter campaign to fund the project, which ends on September 8. So far, they’ve raised close to $4,000, but they’re still nearly $16,000 away from their goal… Any donation will make a difference!

Colombo urges people to get involved however they can: “A donation to this project is a donation for a cause to create harmony between people and cultures.”

And music is a universal way to unite individuals–no matter their age, gender, status, race, or ethnicity. It triggers emotions that flow into the soul; bridges the gaps between similarities and differences; and creates lifelong bonds and memories.

In regards to the ways people use music as a tool to heal, bring joy, and resonate within, Colombo says: “We’re not really all that different from one another… We want people to understand and embrace that.”

For those interested in donating to the campaign or obtaining more info, be sure to check out the group’s Kickstarter page.

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